Featured Animator: Rocque - Baby New Year (Part 5)

Rocque
GoAnimator Rocque is the September winner of my GoAnimate, Get Featured in TET's Blog contest. Rocque has had her account with GoAnimate since March of 2011 and in that time has amassed 915 followers and published 78 animations.

Rocque chose to feature her animation Baby New Year (Part 5), saying...

"I chose this animation to feature because I think it is my favorite one so far out of the series that started as Baby New Year then was going into a series titled 2012. It seems so long ago now. This one is special because of the incredible voice acting. I was honored to have Hollywood3514, Latin Fire, J Files Graphics, and RoTV take time out of their busy schedules to lend voices. It was almost 6 minutes long and there were a lot of lines."

Watch Rocque's animation below and then read about her inspiration and challenges in creating the video.

Baby New Year Part 5 by Rocque on GoAnimate


Inspiration...


When 2011 was nearing its end there were so many rumors about 2012 being the end of life. So I started the Baby New Year series.

 I still have not really gone into too much detail about what happened, but the short story is that something happened and Baby New Year was not growing. He was stuck in infancy and that could only mean something had gone wrong with time. That was the premise for my series in my mind.

As a baby he was being sheltered by the girl (Hope), and the Ravens had to find a way to take him. Whether the little ravens are good or bad still remains to be seen. So I am not even near to be finished with this series even though the year is long gone. 

 I like to leave a lot of unanswered questions in my animations to see who can figure out what direction I am going in. Especially in a series like this was intended to be. 

 I also was inspired because I was spending lots of time in hospitals with my mother who had a turn in her health and I got into watching some older anime series with really cool sword fights and magic.

Main Challenge...


There were a lot of challenges in making this animation. Syncing the scenes was not as easy then. Getting all the scenery to move in one or two directions, the sky to move in another and then the characters to move, too, was very time consuming and challenging. It was still fun though. 

I wanted there to be a lot of scenery changes to keep it really interesting for the viewer. 

Up til this time I never really used sword fights, and I did not want a full sword fight but something that would draw in interest for future sword fights. That was before the tutorials and the fabulous fights we now are used to seeing. I wanted to have the female fight but not to kill just to establish who had more power. I was hoping people would notice the Raven had the more powerful sword and it had magic attributes. 

Techniques I used were adjusting frame lengths, parts of the frame that the viewer could access, and a whole lot of trial and error. I spent hours finding the right music, deciding on volume and layering. I wanted this to be Go Animate Epic!

In the end I am happy with the results. I loved the Sea of Sorrow part, too. There is just a lot in this animation. I admit I do watch it still, and when I do I get inspired to continue the series even though I might not until 2015. If people have suggestions maybe they can let me know.

If you've enjoyed Rocque's work then why not check out more of Rocque's animations on GoAnimate.

Runner up Featured GoAnimators for the month of September included:

Business Animation: Your Terrible Script, How to Make It Better

I can't begin to describe how hard it is to work on a business explainer animation that has a terrible script. The script that the client wrote so they don't have to pay me to write it properly, with fewer words and an easier to understand structure.

It's especially difficult when the person creating the explainer video (i.e. me) doesn't understand the product from reading the client's script, even after asking the client questions. You'd think that would send alarm bells ringing for the client that maybe their script just doesn't do the job.

If you do happen to be writing an explainer script for your product or service then it pays to follow a tried and tested structure which is as follows:

1. Define the problem your product or service solves.
2. Introduce your product or service as 'the solution'.
3. Describe how your product or service solves the problem and why it's the best solution.
4. Summarize your product or service and what it does.
5. Call to action - e.g. 'Contact us', 'Visit our website' etc.

Often when I'm writing a script for a client I'll use the points above as headings to help make sure I maintain that structure. From there, the goal is to fill out each section using as few words as possible whilst still getting your message across.

The largest section will be point 3, the rest you should be able to manage with two or three sentences at the very most. Remember, shorter is usually better.

Need an example? Let's look at my own promotional video for my animation4business site...



My video starts by defining the problem in just 16 seconds: You need an animated video but it's hard to get quotes because other studios don't advertise their prices, are expensive and probably beyond your budget.

Next I offer my animation service as the solution and give you my starting price right there in the video in just 11 seconds.

For the next 47 seconds I describe my animation service and tell you all the essential features and benefits including some additional fees you might encounter if your video needs to be longer or requires custom elements.

Then I spend 24 seconds summarizing what I've just explained and throw in a few smaller details to add some extra credibility - like my experience with using GoAnimate as the third most fanned user of all time.

Finally, the last 10 seconds asks the viewer to either email me or visit my website.

Notice just how much information I managed to squeeze in to my animation and I still managed to keep it 8 seconds under two minutes.

This structure is not the only way to construct an explainer video but if you've never written one before it's a good starting point for keeping your thoughts focused and your video content organised.

If you have already written a script you can use the points above as a check list to see if you've covered all the essential components in a logical order. If you haven't then consider a rewrite using this structure and your script may be all the better for it.

At least you won't be submitting a terrible script for me to decipher if you decide to use my services.


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