Animating Comments with GoAnimate

One of the ideal uses for a website like GoAnimate is creating animations based upon comments, feedback and conversations online.

The kind of thing you just wouldn't sit down and spend months animating - well, maybe, if you're from Ardman Animations scouting for a new season of Creature Comforts you might - but for the rest of us... probably not.

However, just for a bit of fun with your friends or simply for your own amusement, animating an online discussion or comment is one of the things GoAnimate can do well without taking months away from more important animation projects.

Here's a recent GoAnimatation I did of an email reply I received about my post, Harry Partridge, GoAnimate, What I Observed.



I did send this person an actual email reply that, after thanking him for his comment, opened with the line written at the end of the animation.

The exchange of emails did lead to a slightly more interesting and coherent discussion than is presented here but the commenter's first email just reminded me of some old guy, like Grandpa Simpson, tapping out a rant on a typewriter thinking that the words would actually make a difference. Hence the reason I was tempted to animate it.

I don't want to prolong the whole Harry Partridge thing anymore than this. I just thought this type of animation is one of the most valid reasons to use a site like GoAnimate. Animations of this kind only appeal to a very minuscule number of people. You wouldn't want to spend months animating for such a small audience.

Xtranormal Summer Movie and SOH Graphic Contests Update

Xtranormal, Star Trek Entry
Summer Movie Contest.
To begin, I'd like to thank all of you that took the time to vote for and Youtube 'Like' my entries in Xtranormal's Summer Movie Contest and the Sydney Opera House's Graphic Contest.

Thanks to your efforts I managed to place a very respectable seventh place in Xtranormal's contest - where the top ten most Liked entries received a prize. Seventh won me 2000 Xtranormal points - which I think equates to about US$20.00 in real money if I had to buy those points. Still, you can do a lot with 2000xp on Xtranormal so it was great to have even placed when I thought I'd be lucky to squeak in at tenth. You can see all the winners on Xtranormal's blog.

GoAnimate SOH Graphic
Competition Entry.
I wasn't quite so fortunate with the Sydney Opera House's Graphic Contest. My entry was accepted into the first round alongside about 53 other entries. Unfortunately I don't know if I got enough votes to make the top twenty that went before the judges (since there was no record of how many votes each entry got) but even if I did, my entry wasn't accepted by the judges for round two.

Interestingly one of the entries that has made it all the way through to round three (the final round) had the same theme as mine (Grandma coming to visit and the children not wanting to be welcomed by her)... I wonder if that one lost a few points for originality?

Since I haven't posted my SOH entry to this blog yet I've embeded it below for your enjoyment. All the backgrounds were created by me using Koolmoves and I voiced the main character (Ben). Ben's Mom and Grandma were voiced by GoAnimater, Lord Sorcery.

Relative Escape by etourist

Like it? Create your own at GoAnimate.com. It's free and fun!

If you're interested in going behind the scenes I created this semi-tutorial video that shows how I created the exterior background of Ben's house (the scene where he's falling from the window) in Koolmoves.





Eric W. Schwartz: Cartoonist, Animator and Amiga Die Hard

July 1992 Edition, CU Amiga
Featuring Amy the Squirrel.
American Cartoonist, Eric W. Schwartz, (whose unofficial Amiga Icon, Amy the Squirrel, is pictured on the July 92 edition of CU Amiga cover on the right) is my only real animation hero. Sure there are the big names like Disney, Chuck Jones, Tex Avery and even Preston Blair whose influences can all be seen in my own cartoons but Eric did what none of the others could. He showed that really great 2D computer animation was within my reach with little more than an Amiga Computer, a copy of Deluxe Paint and Moviesetter.

This was at a time when computer based animation was in its infancy (outside of computer game animation) and Flash was something that lights did.

There were many great Amiga artists but Eric was really the only one consistently making very funny, traditional style animations. His humor and drawing style is heavily influenced by classic Warner Brothers and Disney cartoons but he managed to build on this, creating something that was recognizably Eric's own style.

I've been wanting to write more about Eric's work since mentioning his influence on me briefly in my Puppy Love post. I also wondered why Eric seemed to have vanished into obscurity after the general demise of the Amiga platform so I did quite a bit of research and was kind of disappointed in the path Eric's art has taken him.

First though, let's look at his art and animation from the height of his fame in the early nineteen nineties.

January 1994, CU Amiga
Featuring Clarissa Cat & Flip the Frog.
Back in the day, before there was such a thing as the internet, we had things like Bulletin Boards and Shareware disks, along with computing magazine cover disks. Which you can imagine makes getting international attention for a few animation shorts all the more difficult and just a little more impressive than in today's internet connected world.

However whenever any of the Amiga Computing magazines of the day did a feature on animation, Eric's work was nearly always there (see the CU Amiga cover above, CU Amiga was a big supporter of Eric's work).

Whilst Eric was most known for his very sexy Amy the Squirrel character and similar characters like Clarissa Cat and Sabrina the Skunk, he also did a considerable number of Aerotoons, Flip the frog toons and a range of one off shorts. These days he's more known for his Amiga Animations paying homage to a brand and operating system that just refuses to die.

You can see a complete library of his animations on the Eric W. Schwartz page at Werner Randelshofer's web site. Whilst you're there you might want to check out some of the other Amiga Artists too.

To begin with I thought I'd show you a couple of classic animations by Eric that both feature plenty of cameos by other characters. Note that these cartoons are low resolution due to the capabilities and limitations of the computers of the day. However the animation is still a joy to watch.

Quality time(below), stars Clarissa the Cat and Flip the Frog, a seemingly mismatched couple and a classic example of a guy 'batting above his average'. No one really knows what Clarissa sees in Flip but he definitely has something special? Flip is a character that Eric 'borrowed' and kind of made his own.

If you're not familiar with Eric's cartoons then be warned this is a little risque but nothing that you'd have to hide from the kids. That was partly the attraction... Eric went just a little more adult than the Warner Bros cartoons that inspired him, without really crossing into the adults only spectrum.



A Walk in the Park (below) features Amy the Squirrel but also pays homage to many of Eric's previous animations with several of the cameo appearances such as the stealth fighter and the exploding lemming. I wish I could find a better quality version of this but I hope the blurriness and compression isn't too distracting.



These days Eric still appears to be working as a freelance artist/illustrator. You can see a few examples of his commercial work over on the AROS Show website (for which he designed the site's mascot/logo) and was interviewed in May 2008.

In terms of personal projects Eric has continued to update his Sabrina Online web cartoon, that first went live back in 1996, on a monthly basis. It's regarded to be one of the longest running web comics online and stars Sabrina the Skunk who lives in the same house as Amy the Squirrel. Obviously the focus is on Sabrina.

In interviews Eric has said that Sabrina shares many of his interests and qualities, hence she has a love of all things Amiga and collects Transformer toys...

I must admit I'd never really read the comic except back in the days when it was published in Amiga Format magazine... and web comics are just not my thing. Which is why I've never started one with any of my own characters. However Sabrina stars in two of Eric's animated shorts both of which show Eric at his best in terms of animated quality and execution.

Plight of the Artist (below), is one lesson that nearly every computer newbie learns the hard way (yes it even happened to me).



Remote Possibilities (below) seems to be Eric's last foray into animating his 'furry' characters. Created in 2003, it's not an original idea but the execution is solid and the homage to different characters is really what makes this a lot of fun.



Eric's art and humor has always been a bit on the edge of adult and politically incorrect humor so it's kind of disappointing to discover Eric has stepped far beyond that line with his own pay Fur Porn Site, Fur After Dark,  featuring his art and characters along with a team of regular artists and their characters too. (Which, BTW, is how Sabrina comes to be working for a porn site in her online web comic. Many of the characters from Fur After Dark appear in Sabrina's comic).

Now I have nothing against Eric running his own porn site featuring his art. It's not really that surprising either given the way he draws his female characters and his sense of humor. However it does mean he doesn't have the time to make the animations that he became known for, that were more suited to main stream audiences. Which is a real shame.

In the last few years the only new animations from Eric have been tributes to the Amiga. A computing platform that could have been a serious competitor to both Apple and PC's had it not been for poor management at Commodore in the system's later years.

Eric's been a strong campaigner for keeping the Amiga alive, not only continuing to use Amiga's himself professionally but also attempting to start a campaign to keep the platform alive through the posting of his Amiga 'Survior' image (above).

Perhaps it's a testament to the Amiga that there are people still trying to keep it and especially its Workbench operating system alive with sites like Amiga Forever where you can emulate the Amiga with software for your PC. I still have my Amiga's (Two A500's and a 600HD) but they went into storage back in 1995 when I bought my first PC because I needed computers that could handle the design work I was doing. Though I did champion Amiga's all through Art School when everyone else was using Macs.

Eric's first Amiga tribute animation, Still Alive (below), really tugs at the heart strings for anyone who owned an Amiga. PC users probably wouldn't understand but Apple owners might. Although Amiga's were very much about the hardware that's not really why we liked them. Like Apple it was all about productivity, creativity and ease of use. Like Apple it was the machine of choice for artists for a very long time.



Eric's final tribute to the Amiga is his Only Amiga, 25th Anniversary Tribute (below) that takes the same characters from Still Alive and features and old Amiga advertising jingle from the late 1980's. The clip is a real nostalgic trip down memory lane and at the same time makes you wish everything that people were saying about Amiga's back then, was still relevant today.



So I guess that's my tour through Eric's career. He seemed like he might go on to greater things with his animations but through the course of my research it seems clear that he's a little like me. Just happy to keep doing his own thing and following the work wherever it happens to turn up.

Unfortunately this has lead to his Wikipedia entry being deleted in a some what insulting discussion by the editors over there who fail to appreciate Eric's significance to the Amiga Community globally.

Personally I just enjoyed his drawing style and bawdy humor. His animations had very little dialogue and mostly relied on visual humor and slap stick with classic comic audio. It was the kind of work I wanted to do and Eric showed us all that it was possible with little more than a home computer and some very affordable software.

If you're a fan of Eric's work you may be interested in an audio interview he did with AmiZed Studios. You may not learn anything particularly new but it was the first time I'd ever heard him speak.
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