Featured GoAnimator: Commedus - The Wizard's Love

Commedus
GoAnimator Commedus is the Inaugural winner of my GoAnimate, Get Featured in TET's Blog contest. Commedus has had his account with GoAnimate since September of 2011 and in that time has had two staff picks and was awarded the much sought after position of Animator of the Month for May of 2012.

Commedus was able to choose any of his animations to be featured and chose one that I hadn't seen until now and am sorry I missed when it was released back in June of 2012. Prop only videos have become something of their own genre on GoAnimate and Commedus, The Wizard's Love is a very beautiful example of what can be achieved.

The Wizards Love by Commedus on GoAnimate

Animation Software - Powered by GoAnimate.

Commedus writes about his animation...
I have picked my animation, The Wizards Love, to represent my work because of all the things it means to me. I know many people may think my party videos, such as The Throne Room Party 1 and 2 and Dead Mans Party, are a better representation of the kind of videos I do. I am very proud of them and like them very much but The Wizards love is my favorite video for many reasons.  
When I first joined GoAnimate prop videos scared me the most. I thought they were the hardest videos to make by far. So, by doing them I over came my fear of them. 
Doing The wizards Love I learned many things. I never thought I could convey so much emotion through simple props, and of course, a good piece of music. 
I had 12 year old children message me and tell me they cried when they watched this. That hit me hard as I never thought I could touch anyone's heart so deeply, especially children. 
Some told me how much they loved the music. Again, who would think that children would love classical music and I could be the one to expose them to it? 
I have gotten the same messages from adults and it means just as much to me also. We can expand our minds and our likes of different music and mediums such as animation and art in general. We just have to be exposed to it in the right way.
The other reason The Wizard's Love, and all of my Wizard videos, mean so much to me is that they represent me in my real personal life. I am a magician in life and this surely reflects that. 
One reason that magic is so important to me is because it helps me to communicate to people of all languages. Everyone in the world understands what they are seeing when they watch magic. 
In the same way my Wizard videos use no words at all in them. The actions of the Wizard speak for themselves and everyone on the site, no matter what country they live in, understands them. The Wizard will always be able to communicate to everyone in the whole world and is indeed a very special thing!
If you've enjoyed Commedus' work then why not check out more of his animations on GoAnimate.

Runner up Featured GoAnimators for the month of December included:

Review: Manga Studio EX4

Manga Studio EX4 is not an animation program. However it is a drawing, illustration and comic creation program that may be of use to the artists among you that want to draw with a professional, digital art package but don't need the photo processing power and cost of something like Photoshop.


If you're coming into animation from a cartooning background, like me, then Manga Studio EX 4 may be right up your alley. Don't stress that it says 'Manga' on the cover, this software can be used to create almost any style of illustration, comic or graphic novel. See the illustration I did on the right as a case in point.

What sets this apart from other art/illustration software is that I would describe it as a 'word processor' for graphic novelists/comic book writers. Not only can you create your art for every page of your book but the software will handle the page layout, right down to headers and footers, and it has special tools to make creating dynamic panel layouts far beyond simply putting every image into a square or rectangular box.

Everything is geared towards publishing your comics either as an online or physical printed publication. It's particularly adept at applying halftones to your image. Something those of you wishing to publish printed works in black and white will really appreciate.

Other dedicated comic book features include fully editable text and speech balloons. A full range of speech balloon styles, all of which you can customize completely to suit your needs.

Personally I bought Manga Studio EX4 as an illustration tool for use with my Wacom Tablet. Plus, as I mentioned, all the dedicated features for drawing cartoons was also a draw card.

Although Manga Studio EX4 does support tablet drawing, including pressure sensitivity, it doesn't appear to support the programmable buttons or control wheel of my tablet in any useful or logical way. For example using the wheel to zoom in and out and to rotate the page (like other illustration software I own does).

Fortunately this problem can be overcome by using the page navigation window which allows you to move around the page quickly using the tablet's pen.

Manga Studio EX4 - The Page Navigation window
on the top right is easy to use.
One nice feature for newer tablet users is the stroke correction box which, if checked, can smooth out those shaky curved lines, often drawn because you haven't quite got the hang of drawing curves with confidence.

I should mention that Manga Studio EX4 is a rastor based drawing program - that is it works with pixels to create your art like most photo processing software. However it also does support vector drawing found in many illustration software tools. Potentially useful if you'll be printing/exporting your art at many different scales. Note that you can't actually export to vector files though, so if you need your art exported as a vector file this isn't the software for you.

If vector art isn't important may even like to consider buying the cheaper version of this software, Manga Studio Debut 4, which has no support for vector drawing at all and is one sixth of the price.

Back to Manga Studio EX4.

I've yet to get through all of the features myself given that I purchased this as an illustration tool and am still learning the software. Some of those features include:
  • Rulers - you can make a ruler out of just about anything and have the lines you draw snap to the ruler.
     
  • 2D Image rendering - take any photographic image and instantly turn it into line art and screen tones for inclusion in your drawings.
     
  • 3D Objects - a library of over 550 3D objects are included which you can import into your drawing position as part of your backgrounds and then turn into line art. You can even import your own 3D objects.
     
  • Filters - included are a whole range of customizeable filters for creating many effects, quite a few specific to cartooning such as adding speed or exclamation lines.
     
  • Color - yes the program can work in full color too.
One thing I will say is that whilst I've been able to learn the basics fairly quickly it's no thanks to the manual and some pretty lame screen grab, annotated tutorials. If you do buy this software go to the tutorials page and skip immediately to the video tutorials by Doug Hill (which begin under the heading 'Manga Studio Debut 4 Tutorials - which you'll need to watch even if you've bought EX4).

The video below is Doug's overview for Debut and EX4. His style is easy to understand and you'll learn a lot very quickly.



There's probably a lot I've missed but overall I'm enjoying using the program for sketching and drawing final artwork with. Its fast and feels natural and responsive when used with my Wacom Tablet (despite the issue of not utilizing the tablet's buttons). It's the closest software I've found to making tablet drawing feel like pencil and paper.

I'd certainly give it my recommendation, especially if cartoons, comics and illustration are your thing.

The circular background motif is one of the
many included materials.

Competition - Get Featured in TET's Blog

In the past I've featured various GoAnimators in this blog that just happened to catch my eye but, since this blog has become something of a resource for many members of GoAnimate, I thought it would be something of an ego boost to have their work featured here on a more regular basis.

As such I've developed a competition for my GoAnimate family where by almost anyone with talent will have the opportunity to be featured right here in this blog.

To announce the competition I created the animation below which features Lil' Peepz versions of myself and my dog, Oscar. (Note: If the video below isn't loading or playing click the link to view it directly on GoAnimate - currently having some issues with GoAnimate Players.)

Competition - Get Featured in TET's Blog by etourist

Like it? Create your own at GoAnimate.com. It's free and fun!

The video won't mean a lot to non-GoAnimate members but if you are then watch for my Invitation to be Featured in TET's Blog post in GoAnimate's Animation in General Forum at the beginning of each month for full details.

Behind the Scenes on my announcement video...

The above animation I actually started work on more than a year ago. It started out as an animated Vlog style video featuring myself and my dog, Oscar (who often does sit right on my desk when I'm working). It was inspired by another GoAnimator's series, Thoughts from your Average Nerd by Newt.

I got about as far as the scene with Oscar scratching and then me saying "Let's tell everyone why we're here..." and then didn't know where to go after that.

As it happened creating business GoAnimations really started to take off for me shortly after, meaning I was kept very busy with other projects. When it came time to finally announce my competition, this animation was just sitting there in draft, perfect for the job and ready to be finished off.

The main point of interest in creating this animation is how I created Oscar (and I bet this is the first time the Lil' Peepz action '1000 punches' has ever  been used to simulate scratching a flea!).

There is no actual dog features in GoAnimate's Lil' Peepz Character Creator that look anything like my dog Oscar so his face is made up of monster eyes and a monster mouth and nose resized quite small.

Oscar has quite long fur when it's fully grown out - people often say he looks like an Ewok when I take him for walks. However his fur is actually much longer than an Ewok's so I'd contest that he actually looks more like a miniature Wookie!

Below is a picture of the real Oscar. His fur isn't even fully grown out here. I think I got pretty close with the cartoon version.


What I didn't get close with is Oscar's body. There is no way to create a four legged character with Lil' Peepz. The closest body type is the one used for creating a turkey Lil' Peepz character. Hence my Oscar Lil' Peepz character is destined to have is body always obscured by a desk, otherwise the illusion of him being a dog is destroyed.

Here's the only place you're ever going to see the character's full body (see image on the right).

Finally the barking you hear in the video is actually Oscar's real barking. Oscar loves to chase me around the back yard, barking whilst he does so. I just recorded him with a mobile phone one time when we were playing.




Drawing Inspiration from Wally Wood's 22 Panels That Always Work

Almost every comic book (or graphic novel) artist eventually comes across American cartoonist, Wally Wood's 22 panels that always work. pictured below. Note that the subtitle, provided by Wood's ex-assistant Larry Hama (who is responsible for compiling this version of Woods Panels), reads:
"Or some interesting ways to get some variety into those boring panels where some dumb writer has a bunch of lame characters sitting around and talking for page after page!"
This suggests clearly that these panels were intended to add life to conversational style scenes with very little action as a way of making the scene more visually interesting. Hence, generally you wouldn't apply these frames to action sequences - though I'm sure some would work.


Although intended for cartoonist and comic book artists many, if not all, of the panels translate reasonably well to film and animation and could serve as a source of inspiration for giving your own films a more visually interesting look. This idea is demonstrated in the Youtube video below which is a film representation of the 22 panels by Kill Vampire Lincoln Productions.



If you're already creating films or animations you've probably already used many of the panels already. I know I often make use of the panel 6 technique in many of my own animations - essentially it's an exterior shot but you can still hear the characters speaking as clearly as if you're standing next to them.

Wally Wood's 22 panels aren't the only shots that always work. In fact the original drawn version by Wally had 24 panels so there's at least two more that always work. However if you're are looking for ways to make a conversational scene more visually interesting and coming up a blank, adding in one or two of these panels may just be the solution.

Doing More with Backgrounds on GoAnimate

If you've ever watched a cartoon on television or at the movies you'll notice that most of the time you never see just one view of any scene. The camera position changes quite often depending on which character is talking or if the director wants to show the scene from a more interesting angle or just a different point of view.

In doing this it creates the illusion that the characters are in a more complete environment much like live action film or video.

With a bit of creativity you can create alternate views of GoAnimate's existing backgrounds using existing props and minimal custom prop creation. Take a look at these examples that I created for various animations.

Enigma Sunshine's Bedroom

Everything in Enigma's bedroom, from my Enigma Sunshine animation, is an existing GoAnimate prop except for the mobile phone on her desk. The room its self is the Comedy World theme's 'girls bedroom' with the addition of a desk and laptop computer.

Different desks were used between the wide shot and the other two shots. Notice that in the central mid shot the bed and mirror are actually in the wrong position in relation to the desk but it still reads as correct unless you really study the relationships between each piece of furniture and where they should actually be.

Hospital Ward

This hospital bed scene (pictured right, top) is another standard Comedy World background that I created an alternate view for in Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots.

The new view in the scene bottom right is looking at the same bed but as if you were standing in front of the curtain looking back the other way. The view reveals a second bed on the ward.

Notice the floor is the original floor from the scene. The beds and drip bags have been flipped and I used the square shape to recreate the back wall and block out the curtain. A window prop has been added.

The only custom part of the scene is the lights on the wall which I simply took a screen shot of from the original scene and turned into a .PNG file prop.

The scene works but those of you with a keen eye will notice some inconsistencies. The switch for the lights is on the wrong side. A set of drawers on the left of the scene is completely missing in the flipped scene.

Note that although the drip bag is positioned on the wrong side of the bed, in my animation I moved it to the other side - which is why the feed is on the opposite side in the new scene.

Original GoAnimate Background
Office Cubicals

Much like Enigma Sunshine's bedroom above with GoAnimate's Comedy World Office cubical scene I added in a whole new cubical in the foreground for an animation that I created for a business client. It's almost the same scene but with the camera zoomed out even further to reveal the foreground cubical.

New foreground cubical.
Everything in this scene is a standard GoAnimate prop though not everything is what it seems. The back of the office worker's monitor is actually a big screen TV from a Comedy World lounge room scene. Most of the desk props come from the Lil' Peepz theme. The original background has been made lighter by covering the whole scene with the stick figure theme's window prop colored white.

Side view of cubical.
For the same animation I also created another view of the foreground cubical. this time a side view. Can you spot the inconsistencies between the two views?


As you can see, extending scenes and creating alternate views can really set your animations apart and give a sense of more three dimensional environments for your characters.

What's more you don't need to do very much in the way of making custom props. Often you can make a new view of a scene with just what GoAnimate has available. Try it in your next GoAnimation.


The War Beyond - TET's First Anime on GoAnimate

The more realistic Anime theme was introduced on GoAnimate back in June 2012. At the time I was very busy with creating business animations but I did take some time to try the theme out and started making The War Beyond.

The War Beyond by etourist

Like it? Create your own at GoAnimate.com. It's free and fun!

The premise of a war starting without the two main characters really being aware of what's been happening in the wider world around them was inspired by the film Tomorrow, When the War Began. In that film the group of teenagers take a camping trip to a remote location only to come back to an invasion of their town that no one was aware was going to happen before they left.

My version looks at the idea that teens are often so engrossed in their own world and circle of friends that they sometimes don't pay attention, or even just ignore, what their parents are doing as well as not knowing about news and current events affecting their community.

The style of the animation (apart from anime) was to try an look like a graphic novel with the choice of camera shots and placement of speech balloons - without actually being a graphic novel. I never considered using TTS voices or having people voice the characters.

I never intended to tell the whole story of the two teens. In fact I came pretty close to just deleting this animation as an unfinished project however I felt there was enough there it would have been a shame not to at least publish what I had.

Back in early November I revisited the animation and decided I had enough scenes to be an interesting narrative. I went through and refined them, then added sound effects and music.

Adding just the right word at the end to sum up what the viewer had just seen took some thinking. I had a few other words in mind but 'Hope' seemed the most appropriate in suggesting that maybe the two teens made it out.

There's not much in the way of technical details and tricks to relate. Most of it is quite straight forward. Of note though include:

  • The picture in the opening scenes falling to the ground from the vibrations of the helicopters. Details like this can really enhance a scene - especially if you add a sound effect to go with it.
     
  • The two characters actually enter the apartment without opening the door yet you hear a door close as the scene dissolves from outside the apartment to inside. This works because a dissolve in film 'speak' represents the passing of time. Even though, in my animation, we're going almost immediately from outside to inside, the dissolve suggests enough time has passed for us not to actually see the characters open and close the door.
     
  • Dialogue is kept short. You learn nothing about either character, not even their names yet, through their exchange, you learn that war has broken out and that the boys parents were at least preparing for it. Everything else is explained through the visuals... even that these two are probably a couple.
     
  • The closing scenes, with the two characters walking down stairs. GoAnimate's Anime characters walk and run in a slightly unrealistic way (you can see it when they run to the television). Originally I had them running down the stairs in a wide shot but it looked so terrible I changed it to two medium panning shots where you can't see their legs at all.
Having used the Anime theme I'm not a big fan. I like all the backgrounds, and the characters are great but the character creator for the theme is so limited right now. Though it's good the characters can 'learn' actions like the Lil' Peepz characters.

If GoAnimate adds more variation and particularly more outfits to the Anime character creator - and perhaps offers a bit more of the theme for gopoints rather than gobucks it could well take off. Right now it's a little expensive for the average user and doesn't offer enough free characters to be much more than a novelty for most people.

Book Review: The Complete Digital Animation Course

Over the course of my life I've owned a lot of books about how to draw cartoons but only one about how to draw and create animation. In case you're interested it is the Walter T. Foster published book How To Animate Film Cartoons (No#190) by acclaimed animator, Preston Blair.

So I thought it was time to buy another book, this time updated to the way animation is created today. Whilst a lot is still hand drawn, as shown in Preston's book, modern animation has embraced the digital age and gone far beyond hand drawing everything. Computers are a big part, and probably even the central tool, in any modern animators tool kit.

I didn't have a lot of money to invest but I tried to go for a book that I thought would cover as much of the animation industry as possible. That's how I came to buy Andy Wyatt's book, The Complete Digital Animation Course: Principles, Practices and Techniques: A Practical Guide for Aspiring Animators.

As an overview of the industry this is a worthwhile book to own for any beginning animator. It's logically set out and begins with equipment and software then follows with four chapters, Pre-Production, Production, Post Production, and finishes with Professional Practice.

Each chapter is then broken down into about two pages on each subject that forms a relevant part of the chapter. For example Pre-Production covers subjects such as Ideas and Concepts, Story and Visual Research, Script Writing, Storyboarding, Film Language, Character Design and more.

The biggest chapter is Production. Just some of the subjects covered include Animation Techniques, Voice Recording, Digital 2D and 3D Artwork, Backgrounds, Staging, Motion Theory, Stretch and Squash, Expression and Lip Sync, Scene Planning and Types of Shot.

Post Production covers things like Compositing for Animation, Visual Effects, Sound Production and Editing.

Finally Professional Practice talks about promoting and selling your work and yourself as an animator.

The book is very easy to read with plenty of photos, illustrations and diagrams to discover and enjoy. Most subjects are covered by two to four medium sized paragraphs backed up with image captions, side bar boxes of tips and other helpful notes.

It's easy to read, easy to put down and come back to if need be - you'll never be stuck in the middle of a subject given that most subjects are covered in two pages. At 144 pages you'll get through it quickly and probably pick up a lot you didn't know. It may even open your eyes to an area of the industry you hadn't thought about trying too.

Where the book falls down is that it describes its-self as an 'animation course' and starts out with small assignments related to the opening few topics. However the assignments appear to be more like 'activities to try' and don't really link with each other in a way that makes you feel like you're progressing or even learning anything substantial.

The assignments may have been more useful for the reader if they worked through a project in some way so that, by the end of the 'course', the reader would have an animated short of their own creation to promote.

My only other criticism is that describing this work as the 'Complete' digital animation course seems a little overstated on the book's content. Although it does cover virtually any topic you can think of, with only two pages devoted to each, it just barely scratches the surface of any topic.

Despite that I'd certainly recommend it as a good starting point for anyone looking to get into digital animation - especially if you're like me and going the self taught route. However it's not the only book you'll ever need. You are bound to want to go into some topics in a lot more detail eventually.

The idea of using the book as a guide for the novice animator is where its strength lies. Think of it as an assistant who knows every step of making a production, who you can consult to make sure you're not forgetting something.

Good value and a worthy first or second book for any would be animator's library.


Tomb Raider to Tears of Steel: 3D Animation with Blender

3D animation (of the polygon and texture map kind not the 3D glasses kind) is something I've wanted to get into ever since I saw the cut scenes created for the original Tomb Raider game back in 1996.

I've embeded the opening cut scene to the first level of the game below. It looks quite primitive now but back then it was very cinematic for a game cut scene. It was the closest thing I'd seen to the possibility of making movies with strong characters directly on a home computer.

The problem was that I never could afford a computer powerful enough to run the software 3D animation programs require. The system I had at the time could just barely run the Tomb Raider game in low resolution mode.



Seemingly, every time I was able to buy a more powerful system, 3D animation software had progressed and required a system more powerful to run it. Because of this I eventually gave up on 3D animation as something that was accessible to me.

Fast forward to the September 2012 release of the Blender Foundation's fouth short film Tears of Steel (embeded below) and you can see just how far 3D Animation within reach of a home computer has come.



The same day I saw this animated short I immediately placed on pre-order the four disk DVD set of the film. That's four disks for a 12 minute film!

If you're not familiar with the Blender Foundation, they're the organisation behind the free, open source, 3D animation software, Blender.

Blender has been around for a long time with its development beginning as far back as 1995. Over the years I've installed it on my computers but have either not had a system powerful enough to run it or just found it very hard to learn.

One thing is for sure, Blender has come a long way. Which is the purpose of the foundations short films - to showcase just what is possible with Blender. Tears of Steel is the first time they've combined live action footage with 3D computer animation.

I must admit I bought the DVD specifically so I could own the film. I could've just downloaded it free from the Tears of Steel website but I was so impressed with it, particularly with the script and the ideas it contains for such a short work that I really wanted to support the people that created it.

However, if you're remotely interested in 3D animation for film and specifically combining 3D computer animation with live action then this is the DVD set to own.

Aside from the film its self the DVD contains everything you need to recreate the entire film from scratch. Not entirely from scratch of course but as close as you can get without hiring all the actors and camera equipment to film the live action sequences yourself.

The DVD's contain all the source and working files used to create the film. The latest copy of Blender along with a bunch of tutorials showing you how things were created.

There is also the obligatory behind the scenes documentary on the making of the film - which is okay but perhaps not as informative as I would have liked. It captures the behind the scenes fun as well as how things were done. I just would've prefer a little more 'How to' and a little less 'fun' scenes.

I'm not going to go on and on about the DVD as I haven't even had a chance to really look through much of it myself. Just watch the promotional video below.



If your budget doesn't run to buying a DVD you can download a much of the content from the Tears of Steel website (and Blender from the foundation website).

I bought it as inspiration to perhaps try 3D animation again now that I can at last afford a computer that can run Blender. As I said if you're at all interested in 3D animation for film then Blender is a great place to start. Especially since you can find a bunch of tutorials online to help get you started.

I'd suggest a good project to work towards would be to give yourself a freaky robot hand!

Mitt Romney's Biggest Army - USA Election 2012

USA Presidential election campaign speeches are so much more interesting and inspiring than the election campaign speeches given by Australian politicians. Personalities play a big part in deciding US elections (as does the Supreme Court for the cynical among you).

I enjoy listening to campaign speeches in the US elections and Mitt Romney's speech at the 2012 Republican convention was a doozie. The video of his entire speech is embeded below but it was his closing comments from about 30 minutes into the speech onward that really caught my attention.



Mitt talks about the threat in Iran and notes that Obama's diplomatic talks with Iran have achieved nothing. He reinforces the idea of a United America and highlights the many soldiers that have died fighting for the values and freedoms that America enjoys. Which got a big cheer. I wonder if anyone who'd actually lost someone in the Afghanistan or Iraq conflicts were cheering? Do those people feel any more free now for their loss?

The quote that particularly left me dumbfounded was, "That a united America would preserve a military so strong that no nation would ever dare to test it."

After all the recent ongoing conflicts do Americans really want to put more of their citizens on the battle front. Seriously? If talks aren't working in Iran what do these people suppose Mitt has in mind - and does he really think Iran wouldn't fight back just because America has a strong military?

I could go on but it was his brief points about America's relationships with various nations and his desire to create an army so awesome all it'll be doing is sitting around navel gazing (since no one's ever going to test it) that inspired my latest GoAnimation music video, The Holy Grail - Mitt Romney featuring my favorite song by Aussie Band, Hunters & Collectors, The Holy Grail.

The song starts with the idea of the biggest army the world has ever seen. From there I tried to pepper the clip with little digs at things Romney has either said or I've heard him or his party talk about in their values and ideals. As well I tried to match the visuals with the lyrics of the song. See how many you can spot.

The Holy Grail - Mitt Romney by etourist

Like it? Create your own at GoAnimate.com. It's free and fun!

As far as making the animation goes, the explosions, some background photos and the wings on Obama are all that isn't stock GoAnimate content. (The wings are an original custom prop I made for Episode 2 of How to Get Views the Evil Genius Way. The explosion is a community prop and the photos of Wall Street and the Dept. of Treasury are from various sites).

I figured since the song is describing a dream then an army of Mitt Romney's wouldn't seem out of place. I then just carried this idea through with multiple Obamas and and army of George Bushes too.

I had hoped to show a much bigger army of Romney's marching along but once you get too many moving characters into the GoAnimate studio on a single scene it starts to slow things down considerably.

Other than that I pretty much made up the scenes as I went taking inspiration from the song lyrics and trying to make every scene count by incorporating those little digs at Romney wherever an opportunity presented its self.

So as not to forget the source of all the jokes (for anyone reading this long after the election is over) here's a list of digs and their inspiration:

  • "In the biggest army the world has ever seen..." (an army of Romneys) - obviously a reference to Mitt's comment mentioned above.
     
  • "The Holy Grail" - Mitt's constantly reinforced his prowess as a successful business man and seems to push this as his number one qualification for running the country. I think his 'Holy Grail' just might be getting his hands on the countries money and seeing if he can turn a profit, err... surplus.
     
  • "Started out seeking fortune and glory..." - umm... successful business man now seeking Presidency.
     
  • "The great crusade..." - reference to the Afghanistan and Iraq wars.
     
  • Osama standing with a sign "No Need to Hide" - They found Suddam Hussein hiding in a hole in the ground. Hard to believe no one knew Osama was living in a house on the border of Pakistan. Without the so called leader of the 'War on Terror' it's hard to keep that agenda going don't you think?
     
  • "We ran into millions and nobody got paid..." - seemed like a good point to highlight the 99%'ers as well as Obama always pointing out that Mitt's always going to be looking out for his rich friends.
     
  • War = Jobs - it's not something the Republicans will come right out and say but aside from an increased need for soldiers during a time of war there's all the sideline jobs as well, e.g. manufacturing weapons, as well as plenty of rebuilding after you destroy your enemies cities and infrastructure - plenty of contracts there to be put to tender to US businesses.
     
  • Sign: "47%'ers get a job!" - Mitt said at a private function that 47% of the population were sponging off well fare payments (well something along those lines). The comment got him into a lot of trouble when it was made public. I imagine a lot of those 99%'ers are probably surviving on well fare.
     
  • Sign: "We'll be back for our 3 Trillion on Monday", empty treasury vault - it was all I could do not to sign the bottom of that sign with 'China'. I think Mitt mentioned a figure of about 3 trillion in debt to China at some point in the first Presidential debate (around the same time he mentioned cutting spending on Public Television). The numbers are moot though. Both Mitt and Obama agree the country is massively in debt so there really isn't any money for Romney to go crazy with if he wins the election.
      
  • "...and you know what they say, nobody deserves to die." Headstone engraved with 'Obamacare' - I think the line in the song perhaps reflects the spirit of Obamacare. i.e. no one should 'die' due to a lack of access to medical care. Mitt on the other hand wants to scrap Obamacare because he believes it's causing a massive blowout in healthcare funding... hence the headstone.
     
  • "I've been searching for an easy way..." Romney and Ryan looking through a financial document for 'loop holes' - The only explanation I've ever heard for how Romney plans to pay for some of his initiatives if elected is by closing loop holes in various policies, programs etc. as well as cutting spending on things that are being paid for by loans from China.
     
  • Clinton Sax Solo - we all know former President Clinton can play sax. Since he was one of the key speakers at the 2012 Democratic Convention it seemed very relevant to at least include him playing over Mitt's 'low'.
     
  • "God knows where I've been...", Sesame Street Sign - In the First Presidential debate Mitt declared he likes Big Bird whilst declaring he's going to cut all funding to Public TV as apparently that's funded by loans from China. God only knows what possessed him to mention a much loved character along side cutting funding and, after the comment went viral, he might be wondering how he ended up on Sesame Street.
     
  • "I'm still here. I'm still a fool for the Holy Grail" - despite a few suspect comments that may have hurt him with voters, Mitt's still very much in the race. At the time of writing this post polling was showing a very close race. You can read what you like into the word 'fool' in relation to Mitt.
     
  • Banner "America Inc." - The key message I get from Romney is that America can and should be run like a business. It's one of his tent pole initiatives. Whilst running a country is a lot like running a business Mitt doesn't seem to understand that Government is about people more than money. However financial responsibility is certainly one of the stronger messages in his campaign.

Alvin the Owl - Embeded Movie Clips in Koolmoves

Alvin the Owl is a character that I originally designed for a business client as one of a selection of owl choices. This version didn't make the cut but I liked him so much I decided to animate him anyway. Eventually I'll release him as a community character on GoAnimate.

In creating Alvin I thought I'd show you how the character is constructed in Koolmoves. In particular how I made use of an embeded movie clip inside the main character movie clip to isolate the head animation from the rest of the body.

The embeded video below is a tour of Alvin's Koolmoves file for his 'standing' and 'stand and talk to camera' actions. It doesn't explain how the character was made (see some of my previous Koolmoves tutorials for that). If you're at this level of creating characters you should be able to work out for yourself how to embed a movie clip within a movie clip.



At the time of writing this blog post this is all that I've done in the way of animating Alvin. I will be adding more actions in the future and may show you more of the character's development in future posts.

Getting Animated Again - TET News

I've been on an extended break from this blog (and pretty much everything I do in the way of creating my own new content) not by choice but because I've been very busy in my Animation Business. I'm certainly not complaining about that but, for me at least, there does come a point in creating animations for clients where all my energy has to go into getting the best result for my client - even if it means cutting back on everything else I do.

Fortunately the work has eased up a little and I feel I can get back into, what I hope will be, regular weekly posts to this blog again. I thought I'd begin with a post about what's coming up that I would like to blog about as well as an update on projects I started but have yet to complete.

Firstly, all the paid work has allowed me to purchase quite a few software packages that I'm sure readers of this blog would like me to review including:
I've also mentioned Crazy Talk Animator Pro as software I use quite often but have yet to review it. As well I've been playing around with Xtranormal's State Software (now known as Xtranormal Desktop), the downloadable version of their online 3D animation software - which I think is well worth a look.

The major project that I announced (and thought I'd be releasing the first part of by now, if not part 2) was episode 2 of my GoAnimate series, Bat Storm. Unfortunately, after writing the script for part 1 and starting to animate the opening scenes, everything went on hold. I do hope to get back to it though and, at the very least, release the first part before the end of the year.

Previously in this blog I started a project to animate some of my own office people characters with Crazy Talk Animator. The project stalled because I've really had a difficult time learning the software. Particularly when it comes to creating vector art characters in Crazy Talk because the process isn't quite as simple as photographic, cut out style characters. However after studying many tutorials I think I know enough to continue in the near future.

As part of a job for client I started to animate a rejected Owl character in Koolmoves for my own interest - and because I  thought the rejected Owl looked better than the one the client went with. The character will eventually become available for the community on GoAnimate once I give it a few more actions. Presently he can stand and talk to camera. I previewed the owl on my Facebook page but you can see him in the image above.

I haven't released any new GoAnimations other than this very short animated writing hand prop that I created for use with GoAnimate's newest business theme called 'Stickly business'. As you can guess the theme is based on stylized stick figures but it also features a number of human hand wipe transitions and prop placements. I wanted a hand that could write and this was the result...

TETs Writing Marker Hand by etourist on GoAnimate

Animation Software - Powered by GoAnimate.

The only other animation I've made public (beyond business animations) is this animated short (below) I created of my Frog Van to introduce the first of my video updates on how the project was progressing. It was created with Crazy Talk Animator Pro. The background is my actual house where the real van is parked and yes, that's me doing the voice of the van.



Some time in the future I'm going to put together an animated web series that features myself, the Frog van, my dog, Oscar, and maybe even my partner Enigma (if I can talk her into being involved). The series will be of our animated adventures (not necessarily taken from our real lives but at least inspired by them).

I'm sure it sounds a bit egotistical to create a series based on myself but they do say you should create stories about what you know... and it's sure easier to voice myself than to have to find people to do voices for me. However that's a fair way off yet.

I think I'll leave it here for now, suffice to say I have a number of GoAnimations in various states of being worked on that may or may not also make an appearance in this blog if and when I finish them. So... there's lots to look forward too.

You are Reading a Top 100 Animation Site That You Need To Know

According to Tom Fronczak of Animation Career Review this blog of mine is a Top 100 Animation Site that you need to know. In fact it comes in at number 88. Given that Tom says he reviewed over 1000 sites to eventually reach his final 100 that makes my appearance just that little bit more special.

Animation Career Review is a site that is geared towards promoting careers in animation and related fields and has the goal of being the number one resource for aspiring animators. As I spend much of my time giving hints and tips in this blog it's great to be recognized on a list that speaks to my own target audience.

I must admit I didn't expect to find myself on the list. I actually saw the article shared on one of my animator friends Facebook pages and decided to post it to my own Facebook wall so I could refer back to it and see if it contained any really useful links. It was certainly a surprise to me (and my friend who hadn't spotted my name in there). For me it's just a nice buzz to be noticed by someone who has probably never in heard of me until they started researching their article.

To put things in perspective, I'm an independent animator, in every sense of the word. Outside of my success with GoAnimate I have next to no reputation or credibility in the animation industry. I've never worked for a studio, never studied animation anywhere beyond reading books on the subject, and have yet to produce any significant animation featuring my own artwork (Does the limited animation of Puppy Love count?).

The closest to anything with any kind of street cred I've done is that I once created an animation for Dream Works Animation SKG (Yes the studio that brought you Shrek and Madagascar). Though it's not something I boast about because the more I explain what the job entailed the less impressive it sounds. Plus it was sub contracted so I never worked for them directly.

Hence why it's nice to get some recognition on a list with plenty of very credible sites. This is the first time my blog has been recognized somewhere that actually matters.





Bat Storm Episode 2 Coming Soon to GoAnimate

Bat Storm meets Pain.
This past fortnight I announced that I had begun work on Episode 2 of Bat Storm by releasing two and a half trailers. I say a 'half trailer' because the third one I released was a re-creation of the second one using different software - more on that later.

The truth is I actually started work on Bat Storm Episode 2 way back in the second half of 2011 (around September I think). Which is when I made the first few scenes of the first trailer I released last week.

Bat Storm Ep2 Coming Soon by etourist on GoAnimate


This airport scene was never part of Episode 2 - not even back then. It was just an idea I had which was triggered by the scene in Superman Returns where Superman catches a crashing plane. I had the thought what if Batman had been there in that scene? There's really nothing for him to do.

You could suggest that he would use his 'smarts' to tell Superman to save the plane but really, does Superman need Batman to prompt him - like some air head muscle guy with no ability to make that connection himself?

The scenes outside the airport were done during the weeks before I published the animation and feature a first look at some Super Charge custom actions (flying and holding up) that I created in Koolmoves.

As I mentioned, I did actually start brainstorming for Episode 2 late last year but at the time I had a very enthusiastic co-creator feeding me ideas for Bat Storm faster than I could think of them. Somehow I got caught in a rut of trying to make those ideas fit into where I wanted to take Bat Storm and it ultimately killed my enthusiasm. I decided to put it all to one side and went on to make a successful second series of my Men In Black parody with Barack Obama and Rashy the Sock Monkey.

I've been listening to a lot of Superhero podcasts of late, such as Batman on Film, Modern Myth Media and Kevin Smith's SModcast shows. Many of which are filled with discussion of the soon to be released The Dark Knight Rises movie. This, of course, has gotten my interest going again for Bat Storm.

The new villain in TDKR is Bane. Since Bat Storm is a parody, and I had used the Joker (The Jokester) in Episode 1 I thought it would be cool to once again parody an actual villain from Nolan's movies. You can see the first image of him at the top of this article. I'm calling him Pain.

Bat Storm's next villain, originally was going to be Cat Woman, for which I'd made a character for before I'd even finished Episode 1. She still may be in Episode 2 but, since I'm still writing it, I can't say for sure.

As I started to write Episode 2, I came up with an opening scene with Bat Storm, like Batman, standing on the ledge of a very tall sky scraper, surveying the city. You've seen this scene in Nolan's Batman films. Batman standing on a high ledge and the camera does a kind of fly around.

I wanted to see if I could recreate that in GoAnimate without going to too much effort which is how the second trailer came about.

Bat Storm E2 Trailer 2 by etourist on GoAnimate


Initially the background for this scene was actual video footage of a camera panning along a city skyline but I had so much trouble with the footage not starting with the animation and not exporting with it either that I had to try something else.

Then I realized I could achieve exactly the same thing just by using a photograph panorama shot and moving it and the building Bat Storm is standing on. (In case you're wondering... that's a view of Melbourne, Australia in the photo).

The end result looked pretty cool. I then had the thought, how cool would it look if, after that long panning shot, Bat Storm jumped off the building? I already had the perfect jump action which I had custom made in Koolmoves back in 2011, so I tried it. It looked so good that I couldn't wait to show it to someone - hence this very short trailer. (For the record, at this stage, I haven't written any scene where Bat Storm jumps off such a high building but you never know).

Regular readers of this blog will know I've been trying to teach myself how to animate with Crazy Talk Animator Pro. I've read many tutorials and watched a lot of tutorial videos and even started work on some Office People characters but haven't made an actual finished animation with it yet.

I looked at my second trailer and wondered if I could recreate it using Crazy Talk? I pretty much had all the components ready made, except for the building Bat Storm is standing on.

That's how my 'half a trailer' came about - since it's really just a recreation of Trailer 2 done in Crazy Talk with slight differences such as Bat Storm doesn't have crossed arms, he's standing on a different building and the colours are brighter overall.

Below you can watch the Crazy Talk version of the Trailer followed by a little behind the scenes explanation of how this animation was constructed. It took me the best part of a Saturday afternoon.



This particular trailer is inspiring me to give Bat Storm Episode 2 a completely different look to Episode 1. I like the cinemagraphic feel of the trailer and I'm thinking maybe using photographs for more of the sets.

I'm also planning to do a lot more custom flash work, not just with actions for the main characters but also with new props as well... such as Bat Storm finally gets a vehicle to drive (but I'm not telling you what he buys with that reward money from Episode 1).

My goal is to make this episode even more like a real cartoon (and possibly even a hint of a feature movie feel too). My tentative release date for the first part of Episode 2 is late August 2012. Which means I should probably get back to writing the script!

GoAnimate Introduces New Anime Theme

GoAnimate's new Anime Theme.
This week drag'n'drop animation site, GoAnimate, launched its new Anime theme (sample image pictured above). The theme represents the most significantly different new style added to the site since the launch of their 2012 Election theme mid to late last year. (Note that I'm excluding the Business Friendly theme because that's only available to business users).

Unlike the 2012 Election Theme the new Anime theme comes with it's own character creator and, in the future, it is planned that you'll be able to buy action packs too (just like the Lil' Peepz themed characters).

As of writing this the Anime character creator is limited to just a few different facial, hair and head features and doesn't yet include outfits. Though you can buy ready made characters with different outfits which you can modify the head, hair and facial features of.

The characters themselves are classic Anime style and seem to centre around school age characters and outfits. Their animation is a little bit choppy but, then again, this is Anime, which often employs lower frame rates to traditional American, Disney style animation.

What's really great about the theme is the large number of backgrounds initially released with the theme (drawn with correct perspective rather than isometric perspective used in the Lil' Peepz theme). Again, a lot of the backgrounds are school interiors but a considerable number are general city locations like parks, street corners, bridges and more.

Initially the theme was released as a GoPlus theme only but GoAnimate seems to have had a change of heart after many basic users were disappointed at being over looked yet again for a new theme release. Anime theme is now available to everyone but you'll still need a lot of GoBucks to access much of it. All of the characters (after the free supplied characters) cost gobucks as do about half of the backgrounds.

I have to say that, initially I was very excited to see a theme that was in a definite animation style that is widely used not just in animation but comics and other art too. It felt like GoAnimate is finally starting to 'grow up' as a serious tool for animation.

I'm hoping they'll develop the Anime character creator so that it is at least as versatile as their Comedy World Character Creator but hopefully they'll push the bar right up to the versatility of their original Lil' Peepz character creator.


I'll be watching to see how the theme is added to over the coming weeks. Especially in terms of action packs and further development of the character creator.





How to Improve Your Interview Animations on GoAnimate

A popular type of animation to make on GoAnimate is Interview Shows. Seems easy enough right? Send a bunch of questions to your guests, have them record their answers then put the whole thing together like a standard, TV talk show.

I've watched a lot of these shows on GoAnimate and a common technique is to send off the same list of generic questions to every guest. Things like...

  • Why did you start using GoAnimate?
  • What is a favorite animation of yours?
  • Who is your favorite animator on GoAnimate?
  • What is your favorite animation on GoAnimate?

There's nothing wrong with these type of generic questions in themselves and it's not wrong to ask them. However, when you get a whole list of these questions in a row and you ask them of every guest, it makes for a very impersonal interview. Especially if you have more than one guest on the same show. It makes the interviewer appear lazy.

Interview shows are all about giving the viewer a personal experience with your guests. They want to see you connect with your guests with questions that draw out information and really tells them something specific about that person. Your viewers will especially enjoy your interviews if you get insights about your guests that they've never heard anywhere else.


Research!

The most important part of your interview show is researching your guests before sending them any questions. If you're interviewing a creative person such as a GoAnimator a good structure for your research is:

  • Early work
  • Popular work (Look for which animations have the most views/recommends)
  • Current work

As you watch examples of their work think about questions you would like to ask about each. Try to be specific. For example, if you look at my very first animation, it's an unsuspecting cat getting squashed by a giant foot (hilarious right?). Perfect opportunity to ask one very generic question but personalized to me..

  • Your first animation was rather unusual, what inspired it?

To which I might answer...
Yeah, it was a cute cat getting squashed by a giant foot... I made that animation really just to try out creating and importing my own props. I'm a huge Monty Python fan so I tracked down the image of cupid's foot, that Monty Python used in their show. 
They used to just randomly drop the foot into a sketch as an unexpected joke ending - which is what I did, kind of, with my animation. It's funny because it's silly. Like a piano falling out of nowhere onto a protagonist- which is a classic comedy joke.
Hopefully you get the idea. Look at what your guests have created and ask questions relating to specific work that they have done. Ask smaller questions so you can get to the detail quicker. For example, instead of asking me...


Why not ask...

  • Of all the characters on GoAnimate, why did you choose Happy Bunny to be the one behind the Complaints Desk?

There's nothing wrong with the first question but I can only speculate on the answer. However, the second question I can give you a specific answer because I know exactly why I chose Happy Bunny.


What to Ask?

Interview shows on GoAnimate are typically short, usually 3-5 minutes. Although you can try, it's pretty hard to cover someone's entire body of creative work in that time. Especially if you want to get good answers of more than a few words.

Not only that but you, as the interviewer, may have no interest in your guests early work - or even their latest work. Which is okay. Ask questions about what you find interesting about your guests (based on your research).

If you're a fan of just one animation or animation series then focus all your questions around that. Ask the questions that you always wanted to ask. Just let your audience know first that your interview will focus on that specific body of work.

Your show will come across as more interesting and personal if you have a genuine interest in your guests rather than asking everyone the same questions like a robot.

How many questions you ask depends on how much time you have. I'd recommend a minimum of five questions to make an interview worth while.


Contacting Your Guests

The beauty of an animation interview show is that nobody has to leave home to create them. Questions and answers can be recorded separately when it's convenient for each person and then compiled together in the final show.

Keeping in mind that your guests are going to have to take time out of their day, and maybe even set up some equipment to record their voice (if you want their actual spoken answers), be sure to invite your guests to be on your show politely.

In your contact message you should introduce your show, perhaps list some guests you've already featured, and ask if they would like to be on the show. Send along the questions you want answered and explain what format you want the answers (as text or recorded voice).

Don't get upset if they decline. People are often busy, don't like recording their own voice or they may not want to answer your questions. Whatever the reason just accept it and maybe ask them again at a future time. Who knows, you may have just caught them in a mood or with an exceptionally large work load and little time.

Note that all audio for your show should be recorded as MP3 files. You'll need to provide an email address or some other means for your guest to send you their recording as an attachment or download.


Mic Check - Audio Fixing

Sound quality is quite important on an interview show. With all your guests using different microphones and environments to record their audio there are a few things you can do to get better audio.

The ideal way to get good audio is to record it under the best circumstances possible.

Encourage your guests to record their audio in a room that doesn't echo (generally a room that has carpet floors and closed, material curtains) with little to no background noise. Ask them not to position the microphone too close to their mouth. Ideally the microphone should be at least 2-3 inches away from their mouth. More if it's a particularly sensitive mic.

After you have receive the audio break out your audio software. I use Audacity but the two effects I'm about to show you can be found in most dedicated audio software and even some video editing software.
Audacity's Noise Removal tool.
The default setting will (shown)
usually do the job quite well.

Before doing anything else with your audio (such as cutting it up into separate answers) open the files in Audicity.

Look at the sound wave in sections when your guest isn't speaking. If the line isn't for the most part flat then this indicates background noise has been recorded. It could be the hissing of the microphone or the sound of a fan (if the audio was recorded on a laptop microphone for example). You can reduce this noise to almost zero by using Audacity's 'Noise Removal' Effect. The default setting usually is all you need.

Audacity's Normalize Effect.
Default settings should do the trick.
The second Effect you should apply to all of your audio is 'Normalize'. Again the default settings are usually all you need. Normalize is particularly effective at boosting the volume on quieter recordings to a more acceptable level but is less effective at reducing the volume on louder recordings. As a result it's better if your guests provide you with low volume recordings rather than really loud, mic right up to their mouth, high volume recordings.

Normalizing will help all your audio sound like it was recorded at the same level. Incidentally these two effects are good to apply to any voice work you do where your microphone isn't of the best quality.

Once you've applied these effects, save out the files, with a different file name (never save over your source files). Now you can start chopping up your improved files into manageable chunks to upload to GoAnimate.


Creating the Show

How you put the show together is entirely up to you. If your guests have their own avatars available you may like to use them. If they normally use a character they've created in one of GoAnimate's character creators you may, if you have the funds, like to recreate that character.

However you represent your guests, be respectful as they've given up some of their time to make your show possible.

Watch any interview show and you'll notice that the camera's view is constantly changing. Never is it one single view for the entire show. There are three standard shots you can switch between to keep your show visually interesting.
  1. Medium Close Up of the Interviewer - use this shot to focus attention of the question being asked.
     
  2. Two Shot - This shows both the Interviewer and Interviewee. Can be used whilst the interviewer is asking a question and/or to show the Interviewee reacting to the question as it is being asked. Can also be used to show the interviewer reacting to an answer as it is being given.
     
  3. Medium Close Up of the Interviewee - use this to focus on the Interviewee as they give their answer.
You can also mix in other shots such as an extreme close up of the interviewee's face - which is used if they are telling a particularly personal story. You could even add extreme wide shots if your animation includes an audience.


The Finished Interview

Below I've created an example animation which is by no means the pinnacle of interview animations but it does incorporate much of what I've mentioned above. I have used Text To Speech (TTS) voices and would recommend you choose the clearest voices if you're going to use them too.

Super Charge Interview by etourist on GoAnimate

Animation Software - Powered by GoAnimate.

Things to notice in the above animation...

  • The interviewer demonstrates he has researched his guest by asking questions that include information about the guest's background and work.
     
  • The interviewer's questions are specific and focus on details about his guest.
     
  • Use of slides to enhance questions and to add visual variety.
     
  • The interview is kept visually interesting by mixing up camera shots. It never holds one camera shot for too long. As a result the two and a half minutes fly by.


Conclusion

Hopefully you've stuck with this rather lengthy article and picked up a few tips on how you could improve your own animated interviews.

Once you do the research and decide what questions to ask, a GoAnimate Interview show is relatively easy to put together. The one I created above I put together in only a few hours (made easier when you're interviewing a character from your own animation - feel free to try it with your own characters).

By not sticking to generic questions that everyone asks and taking some time to make your show visually interesting will make your Interview Show stand out from the rest.

You Want How Much!? Comparing the Cost of Business Animation

In my business of creating GoAnimate cartoons for commercial clients I get many inquiries about pricing. I'm pretty up front about my fees which, at the time of writing this, are as follows:

  • Any GoAnimate animation up to 2 minutes in length will cost US$297.00. Additional minutes will be charged at $99.00 per minute. 
  • The final HD quality video will include a commercial license fee of $79.00.

This is the bare minimum cost of creating an animation with GoAnimate. I also include a list of extras that may add to the cost:

  • Script development - if not providing a completed script.
  • Voices - if not using GoAnimate Text To Speech Voices or providing your own voices as MP3 files.
  • Custom image work including custom flash props, backgrounds and animation.

Where possible I try to do as much as I can with GoAnimate's existing content so as to avoid the need to create any custom props or animation.

So your minimum spend with my service is $376.00 for which you can get up to 2 minutes of animation.

Despite my prices I still get people reminding me they are on a very tight budget or asking for further discounts. Which I understand but I'm already undercharging for my service because of the perception that anyone could make quality animations with GoAnimate.

Which is true. If you have the time to learn the GoAnimate studio and some basic film making techniques, then you could make an animation of good quality... eventually. But why bother if you can pay someone like me, who's done all that learning for you and can make your animation right now?

What is my expertise with GoAnimate and knowledge of film making (which I've done courses in along with a lot of book reading on the subject) worth to you?

Time for a reality check.

GoAnimate animations may come with a lot of compromise when it comes to adapting it's pre animated characters to your project but I've seen a lot of fully customized animations (created in software such as Adobe CS5 and Toon Boom) that could have been done in GoAnimate just as effectively.

Hunting around the internet I've found some prices, for fully custom animations, from various studios which I've listed below.

Keep in mind I'm not saying these studios are over charging or not creating quality work (by all means check out their show reels and compare them to what GoAnimate can do). I'm just providing information for you to consider. Kudos to these studios for putting their prices online as most want you to ask for a quote.

  • One Whale - Cost on average $100 per second. ($12,000.00 for 2 minutes of animation).
    Australian based Business Animation Studio working with some high profile voice actors and former Disney Animators.
     
  • Mair Perkins Animation and Illustrations Ltd. - Cost up to 90 seconds of animation £650.00 ($1038.00).
    U.K. based Animation and Illustration studio creating animations for commercial clients. Founded by Animator and Illustrator Mair Perkins.
     
  • Rossiter and Co - Cost of 90 second animation  £1899.00 ($3032.00)
    U.K. based company specializing in video multi-media for business including animation.
     
  • Epipheo Studios - Cost of 90 second animation up to $15,000.00
    Based in the USA, Epipheo has become one of 'the' companies to have your business animation created by. Known for their simplistic animation style teamed with a quirky sense of humor.

When you look at those kinds of prices, $376.00 for up to 2 minutes (that's 120 seconds) of animation, you begin to realize just what a great price you're getting and just how much I'm already saving you by choosing to use my service.

Think of how many animations I could make for you for $15,000.00 with GoAnimate.

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