Business Animation: Your Terrible Script, How to Make It Better

I can't begin to describe how hard it is to work on a business explainer animation that has a terrible script. The script that the client wrote so they don't have to pay me to write it properly, with fewer words and an easier to understand structure.

It's especially difficult when the person creating the explainer video (i.e. me) doesn't understand the product from reading the client's script, even after asking the client questions. You'd think that would send alarm bells ringing for the client that maybe their script just doesn't do the job.

If you do happen to be writing an explainer script for your product or service then it pays to follow a tried and tested structure which is as follows:

1. Define the problem your product or service solves.
2. Introduce your product or service as 'the solution'.
3. Describe how your product or service solves the problem and why it's the best solution.
4. Summarize your product or service and what it does.
5. Call to action - e.g. 'Contact us', 'Visit our website' etc.

Often when I'm writing a script for a client I'll use the points above as headings to help make sure I maintain that structure. From there, the goal is to fill out each section using as few words as possible whilst still getting your message across.

The largest section will be point 3, the rest you should be able to manage with two or three sentences at the very most. Remember, shorter is usually better.

Need an example? Let's look at my own promotional video for my animation4business site...



My video starts by defining the problem in just 16 seconds: You need an animated video but it's hard to get quotes because other studios don't advertise their prices, are expensive and probably beyond your budget.

Next I offer my animation service as the solution and give you my starting price right there in the video in just 11 seconds.

For the next 47 seconds I describe my animation service and tell you all the essential features and benefits including some additional fees you might encounter if your video needs to be longer or requires custom elements.

Then I spend 24 seconds summarizing what I've just explained and throw in a few smaller details to add some extra credibility - like my experience with using GoAnimate as the third most fanned user of all time.

Finally, the last 10 seconds asks the viewer to either email me or visit my website.

Notice just how much information I managed to squeeze in to my animation and I still managed to keep it 8 seconds under two minutes.

This structure is not the only way to construct an explainer video but if you've never written one before it's a good starting point for keeping your thoughts focused and your video content organised.

If you have already written a script you can use the points above as a check list to see if you've covered all the essential components in a logical order. If you haven't then consider a rewrite using this structure and your script may be all the better for it.

At least you won't be submitting a terrible script for me to decipher if you decide to use my services.


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