Skip to main content

Tips on How to Create Background Scenes in Reallusion's Cartoon Animator Using Your Content Library

This background is made from a mix of props from six different content packs.
This background is made from a mix of
props from six different content packs.

One of Reallusion Cartoon Animator's selling points is that it can speed up your animation workflow with its time saving features. Among those features is the software's Content Library, a collection of premade, characters, props, scenes, motion files, and more, that either came with the application or you've added with purchases from Reallusion's Content Store or Marketplace

If you've been following along, I've been reviewing applications I'm using in the process of creating my latest animated short featuring my original characters, Mia and the Tourist (and their replica, sentient, R2-D2 droid). Previously I wrote the script with KIT Scenarist, and drafted a storyboard using Wonder Unit's Storyboarder.

In this post I'll show you how I designed my backgrounds for my animation using my extensive Content Library collection. I'll give you tips for making your own scenes from existing content. At the end I'll give you a list of all the content packs I used and links to where you can find them in  Reallusion's Content Store or Marketplace.

Two Approaches to Scene Design (Well Okay, Three...)

It's completely possible to draw all your background scenes from scratch in any graphics application that supports .PSD files. There's nothing wrong with this. Great if you can. However, to save time, it can be far quicker to use existing, premade scenes, or 'kit bash' a scene together using bits and pieces of existing premade scenes and props from Cartoon Animator's Content Library.

Using Existing Premade Scenes 'As Is'

Obviously this is the fastest method that works best if you know what scenes you have in your library, and storyboard with those scenes in mind. This is why it's extremely advantageous to become very familiar with your Content Library. Know your scenes, and just pull them straight onto the Cartoon Animator stage as needed... done!

'Kit Bashing' Scenes Together

At some point you're not going to be able to just purchase an 'off the shelf' scene. This is where 'kit bashing', the practice of piecing a background scene together from bits of existing scenes and other props you have in your Content Library, comes in. Knowing your Content Library will speed up the process.

Kit bashing is what I'm doing for my latest animation featuring Mia and the Tourist, which requires at least two different background scenes.

Creating My Background Scenes

Although my storyboard contains three actual backgrounds, two different exterior shots of the Rental Car lot and one interior of the sales office, it's important to note I'm not married to recreating the exact views in my storyboard.

Whatever content I find in my library will largely dictate how my backgrounds look and whether I can achieve the exact camera angles I planned, or if I need to compromise.

Scene 1: Exterior - Rental Car Lot - Daytime - Establishing Wide Shot.

Opening scene: Exterior, extreme wide shot of the Rental Car lot with R2-D2 browsing.
Opening storyboard scene: Exterior,
extreme wide shot of the Rental Car
lot withR2-D2 browsing.

When I write a script I never think about what I have in my Content Library so I end up kit bashing nearly all my background scenes. Case in point, this establishing wide shot of the car rental lot. In my storyboard it's a bird's eye view of the lot, which is not a typical angle for most premade scenes in Cartoon Animator.

The scene will be used for about 2-3 seconds at the start of the animation to establish that R2-D2 is looking around the lot on his own. It's going to be the hardest scene to create and how it comes together will help inform the look and style of my other two scenes.

Remember when you're loading a complete scene onto the Cartoon Animator Stage, to cherry pick items for your scene, only one scene can be on the stage at any one time. So make sure anything you want to keep on the stage is converted to a prop (with 'convert to prop' under the file menu or by right clicking on the item and selecting this option from the menu) and is not listed as part of a scene. Anything that is part of a scene will be deleted and replaced with the new scene. When you've finished your scene, if you want to save it as a scene (and not a project) You'll need to select everything that is a prop on the stage, go into the file menu, and select 'convert to scene'.

[Cut to a week or two later] After really looking through my Content Library I decided to drop the birds eye angle in favor of a ground level view (shown below) that I could show in a wide enough establishing shot for the same purpose.

The Exterior Car Rental Lot Background.
The Exterior Car Rental Lot Background.

You'll notice the lot looks a little empty, the grey car has no wheels, and there is a random tree in the air on left (which is part of the same prop as the tree near the street light). These aren't an issue because the widest the camera actually sees this scene is shown in the feature image at the top of this post. You can see there's no need to put wheels on the grey car since you won't see them. 

I extended the city scape out at each side because the original background (by Kel Harper) wasn't wide enough to fill the entire wide shot background I need. If you look closely you can see where I've duplicated and flipped the city buildings on each side so they join up seamlessly. Also by doing this I have some room to pan the camera side to side to show off the parallax effect of the cars in the foreground.

I've also added a purple filter (i.e. purple rectangle with the opacity set to 50%) over the city scape to tone down and unify the colors so they don't draw your attention away from what what's going on in the more colorful Car Rental lot. 

Scene 2: Interior - Rental Car Office/Reception - Daytime.

Interior, Car Rental Office storyboard sketch.
Second storyboard scene: Interior,
wide shot of the Rental Car office with the
Manager, Mia and the Tourist.

This is the main location of my animation where most of the dialogue takes place. It introduces the rest of the cast, visually, and needs to convey that there are windows that look out into the lot because one character (the Tourist) is keeping an eye on R2-D2 as the other two characters are having a conversation.

Designing this scene was much easier than the exterior because my Content Library is filled with scenes of various rooms from this angle. That said, it still wasn't simply a case of just picking one.

The scene is still a kit bash background. The trickiest part was recreating what can be seen outside the one window in shot, to match the exterior of the building in the previous background.

Below is the full scene. In the animation the camera frame will be pretty tight on front desk area but wide enough so you can see about a third of the window on the right in shot.

Car Rental Sales Office Interior.
Car Rental Sales Office Interior.

Most of the content used is straight forward as is except for a little bit of stretching (e.g. the reception desk to make it longer) and I used Cartoon Animator's Render Styles feature to get everything in matching shades of blue.

On the right of the above image you can see I used the same base exterior building prop I used for the exterior in the previous scene to make the visible section you can see from the window. This required  some heavy distortion of the prop to make it work.

This image demonstrates how the wide shot of the finished scene will be cropped.
This image demonstrates how the wide shot of the finished scene will be cropped.


Scene 3: Exterior/Interior - Rental Car lot/Office - Daytime.

Third storyboard scene: Interior/exterior, wide shot of the Rental Car office interior and R2-D2 in the foreground.
Third storyboard scene: Interior/exterior,
wide shot of the Rental Car office interior
and R2-D2 in the foreground.

This scene is an eye level view of the lot, as if you were looking across from the fence line toward the main office. Both R2-D2 and the cast inside the office need to be in frame as you will hear dialogue from the office that refers to R2-D2 and his needs in a rental car.

[Again cut to a week or two later] One of the reasons I changed my opening scene to a ground level view was so I could reuse the scene again for this shot. It's easily created by cutting into a section of the first exterior scene as shown below.

All I've added to the scene is some masking shapes to hide my characters feet and legs, so it looks like they are inside the office.

Interior/Exterior shot achieved just by moving into the first scene and adding some masking to hide the legs of the characters inside.
Interior/Exterior shot achieved just by moving into the first scene and
adding some masking to hide the legs of the characters inside.


---o ---o--- o---

Hopefully you've found my run through of how I created my scene backgrounds useful. To finish up I'll leave you with a list of my best tips for kit bashing your own background scenes followed by my content sources if you're interested in purchasing any of these packs.

Kit Bashing Tips

  • Try not to mix too many art styles. If you can, pick props and scenes from artists that have similar styles.
  • Decide on whether your scene will feature art with (usually black) cartoon outlines or no outlines as a mixture will look amateurish unless....
  • If you do mix outline and no outline props and characters it's important to do it in a consistent way. For example, divide your Z plane axis (distance of the camera from the scene in 3D space) into near and far away. Anything far away doesn't have and outline. Anything near does have an outline. The opposite of this probably wouldn't work as showing an outline implies you're seeing more detail. Objects further away from the camera typically show less detail.
  • Generally if you are using outlined props in your scene then characters need to have outlines too because they will be 'near' the camera. If you aren't using any outlined props in your background then you can use either outlined characters or non outline characters but don't use a mix. Characters need to have the same or similar art style.
  • Try to unify the color scheme of your background to a limited palette. Too many colors will distract from the characters in your scene. You can do this inside Cartoon Animator either by using the Render Style tool, or by applying a color shape filter (as I did in my first scene on the cityscape) with the opacity set to however strong you want the color to be (50% is a good starting point then adjust as needed).

List of Content Sources (Content Store and Marketplace)

    Rental Car Exterior
        Rental Car Interior

          Comments

          Popular posts from this blog

          Featured Animator: Christian Haynes - 'Zack In Time' An Original, Independent, Animated Series on the Rise

          Christian Haynes - Zack In Time.  If you've ever wanted to create an animated TV series staring your own original characters and stories then Los Angeles based writer, director, and animator, Christian Haynes is taking those next steps of putting together a team, developing a pitch/trailer for their series, Zack In Time. Featuring professional studio quality animation, they hope the show will get picked up by an animation studio for an official series. The path he and his team are taking is one you could easily follow as they deal with real life commitments, and building a following on Instagram and Tik-Tok showcasing their work behind the scenes. TET: Tell me a little about yourself. Who you are, and why you started animating? My name is Christian Haynes and I've loved animation ever since I was a kid. I would constantly be drawing cartoon characters from TV shows and movies and making my own little homemade comic strips.  As I got older, I became a lot more interested in st

          Wonder Unit Storyboarder - Free Storyboarding Software for People Who Can (or Can't) Draw

          Wonder Unit Storyboarder.  As an independent and solo animator I'm always tempted to try and skip storyboarding my animated shorts because they're usually only single scene sketch comedy type jokes. As a result I have many unfinished projects that kind of petered out due to having no clear finishing line. Storyboarding your productions, no matter how small, gives you a step by step guide of every shot that needs to be completed (no planning shots as you animate). It also allows you to create an animatic that gives you a rough preview of the finished production. In short, you shouldn't skip storyboards as they, generally, increase the chance of the project being completed. Disclaimer - I'm Not a Fan of Storyboarder Upfront, Wonder Unit's Storyboarder  is not my preferred storyboarding software. However it's completely free, has a number of very compelling featu

          Shotcut - Free Open Source Video Editor for Windows, Mac, and Linux

          Shotcut Open Source Video Editor. I've been on the hunt for a while now for the best, free, open source, video editing application out there. In Shotcut , by Meltytech , which has versions for Windows, Mac, and Linux, I think I may have found a real front runner. This won't be a feature filled review, rather it will be my first impressions after having used Shotcut on a few of my YouTube videos so far. One of my key criteria for a video editor is the ability to import any video format directly into the project. This may seem like an odd focus initially but having convert video to something your video editor can use is annoyingly time consuming, and it creates a new generation of footage, potentially with a loss in quality if you don't really know much about video format specs (that's this guy right here!). Shotcut will happily work with my OBS recordings (.FLV), and .MOV, .MP4 files that I get from two different cameras. Not only that but Shotcut doesn't hold me up

          Artbreeder - Using AI created Character and Background Content in your Animations

          A selection of User/AI generated images from Artbreeder. If you're looking for an endless supply of 2D character and background images for your animations then Artbreeder , an online Artificial Intelligence (AI) that generates image mash-ups you can tweak as much as you like, could be the ultimate content library. What is Artbreeder? Artbreeder is free to use though there are various paid plans, that give you additional features, such as higher resolution download images or more settings to play with. All images created on the site are Public Domain (CC0 License) and can be used in commercial projects. Using Artbreeder's online app you can generate head shot portraits, full body characters, landscapes, and other scenes simply by choosing two or more existing images to mash together then, using a series of sliders, to select which traits from each image you wish to lean toward in the final image. Photo Comparison - Top is my original uploaded photo. Bottom is Artbreeder's ap

          How to Use Plask and Reallusion's 3DXchange to Create Full Body 3D Motion Capture Animation for Cartoon Animator

          Last month I reviewed Plask , a free, browser based app that allows you to create 3D motion capture files for animation from a webcam or prerecorded video footage. At the time my hope was that Plask could be used to create 3D motion capture files for Cartoon Animator 4. Unfortunately my knowledge of how to export 3D animation motion files between applications is fairly basic and I wasn't able to figure it out. However, thanks to 3D animation enthusiast and game developer, Freedom (of the YouTube Channel Freedom Arts ), who published a tutorial on how to use Plask with iClone7 characters (in my review I wasn't able to work that out either) there is now a workflow from Plask, via Reallusion's  3DXchange , to Cartoon Animator that is relatively easy to follow and works well. Note: If you want to try this out, 3DXchange is available as a free 30 day trial download if you don't have it. Creating Your 3D Motion Capture File in Plask I'm not going to do a detailed run

          Creating a G3-360 Head From a Single Photo in Reallusion's Cartoon Animator

          Source Photo from Generated Photos . Ever since Reallusion introduced the G3-360 Character Head into Cartoon Animator 4 I've wanted to see if their 360 Head Creator tool could be used to create an animated head using a photo. Part of the reason I've never given this a shot, until now, is that I just assumed it would be difficult, and require a lot of photo editing to blend out the sprite edges. It turns out, creating a photographic G3-360 head is not that much more difficult than creating a cartoon head, and can be done using a single photographic image using my own G3-360 head rigging system . While this article isn't intended to be a full tutorial, I'll run through the basic steps of how I achieved my photographic G3-360 head, shown in the comparison below, of a Cartoon Animator Morph-based head on the left, and my G3-360 head on the right. Pros and Cons Cartoon Animator's morph-based head system is ideal for animating photographic faces. It uses a semi 3D wire me